The Ford 9N/8N. When these appeared in the early thirties they were perhaps one of the most important technological developments in America and increased a man's productivity on the farm by multiples. They are right up there with the Singer sewing machine in this regard. This one was rebuilt and refurbished in Albany, Oregon by a group of FFA kids under the direction of super teacher Kirk Hutchenson. The restoration got a blue ribbon at the County Fair and did very well, I forget what place, at the State Fair. Of course the more recent fancy Japanese diesels are pretty spiffy, but, they cost as much as a big Mercedes, and are really only a refinement of Ford's solid, basic idea. I was a little skeptical that it would be anything more than a nostalgia trip until I began to use it. I cannot begin to tell you all the things it has done. What set it apart from it's rivals of the time was a simple hydraulic system that makes all sorts of attachments practical: posthole diggers, cement mixers, mowers, blades, scoops, chippers, plows, rakes, etc.etc. The engine is basically a Model A, probably of 20 hp or so. Parts are readily available at any Ford dealer. You could just about rebuild one in the field. America will be great again when it recognizes that a product depends as much on its "intellectual content" as it does on its material. Not too much, Just enough...the very definition of elegance. Go find one and give it a home.
So if you need parts for your old tractor, here's a great source...Walt's Tractor Parts.
Okay, so maybe the "Red Belly" Ford doesn't appeal to you...take a look at a site with lots of pictures of very cool lookin' old tractors. .....